Archive for the 'Plants' Category

May 01 2016

Let’s Get Outdoors in May

Golden ragwort (photo by Kate St. John)

Golden ragwort (photo by Kate St. John)

Oh my!  It’s May!

Last month I listed outings for the last week of April and included May 1.  Here’s a big list for the month of May.

Everyone is welcome to participate in these outings. Click on the links for directions, meeting places, what to bring, and phone numbers for the leaders.

2016: Date/Time Focus Location Leader & Link to more info
Sun. May 1, 8:00am All Day! Birds & Flowers Enlow Fork Extravaganza, Washington/Greene Counties Wheeling Creek Watershed Conservancy / BotSocWPA / Ralph Bell Bird Club
Wed. May 4, 8:00am Birds Linbrook Woodlands, Allegheny County Karyn Delaney & Bob Van Newkirk, 3RBC
Fri. May 6, 7:30am Birds Sewickley Park, Allegheny County Sheree Daugherty,  3RBC / Fern Hollow Nature Center
Sat. May 7, 10:00am Flowers Raccoon Creek Wildflower Reserve, Beaver County Dianne Machesney, BotSocWPA
Sat. May 14, 7:30am Birds Barking Slopes, Allegheny County Todd Hooe, 3RBC Outing is limited to 12 people. See 3RBC link to reserve.
Sat. May 14, 10:00am – 3:00pm Flowers Mountain Maryland Native Plant Festival, New Germany State Park, Garrett County, MD see BotSocWPA website for info
Sat. May 14, 1:00pm Flowers Oil Creek State Park, Venango County Robert Coxe, BotSocWPA
Sun. May 15, time to be announced Flowers Pittsburgh Botanic Garden, Allegheny County BotSocWPA
Sun. May 15, 8:00am Birds Barking Slopes, Allegheny County Todd Hooe, 3RBC Outing is limited to 12 people. See 3RBC link to reserve.
Sat. May 21, 8:00am Birds Harrison Hills, Allegheny County Jim Valimont, 3RBC
Sat. May 21, 8:00am Birds Presque Isle State Park, Erie County Bob Van Newkirk, 3RBC
Sat. May 21, 10:00am Flowers Moraine State Park, Butler County see BotSocWPA website
Sun. May 22, 8:00am Birds Frick Park, Pittsburgh Aidan Place, 3RBC
Sun. May 22, 8:30am Birds & Flowers Schenley Park, Pittsburgh Kate St. John, Outside My Window

 

Don’t miss May’s excitement.

Let’s get outdoors!

 

(photo of golden ragwort by Kate St. John)

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Apr 21 2016

Blooming This Week

Published by under Phenology,Plants

Early saxifrage, Raccoon Creek Wildflower Reserve, 17 April 2016 (photo by Kate St. John)

Early saxifrage, Raccoon Creek Wildflower Reserve, 17 April 2016 (photo by Kate St. John)

Wildflowers are blooming throughout the Pittsburgh area.  This week I traveled southeast and west to record their progress.

At Raccoon Creek Wildflower Reserve on April 17 the earliest flower — skunk cabbage — had disappeared among the plant’s large leaves.  Toad trillium (Trillium sessile), wild blue phlox (Phlox divaricata) and early saxifrage (Micranthes virginiensis) were open. White large-flowered trillium was not.  I found an interesting sedge but I don’t know its name.

Braddock’s Trail Park in Westmoreland County has a south-facing slope so it’s flowers were much further along than Raccoon, even though I visited a day later.  Small-flower crowfoot (Ranunculus micranthus), Canada violets (Viola canadensis) and rue anemone (Thalictrum thalictroides) were in full bloom while blue-eyed Mary (Collinsia verna) carpeted the forest floor.  Trillium were already at their peak.  Dwarf larkspur (Delphinium tricorne) had just begun.

Click here or on the photo above for a slideshow of the flowers.  (Unfortunately the sun was so bright that it washed out the details of white flowers … I tried anyway.)

Look for wildflowers this weekend before the trees leaf out. Go north to see early flowers. Go south to see late blooms.

When the woods are in shade the flower party will be over.

 

(photos by Kate St. John)

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Apr 19 2016

Let’s Get Outdoors: April 23 to May 1

Great chickweed, Braddock's Trail Park, 18 Apr 2016 (photo by Kate St. John)

Great chickweed, Braddock’s Trail Park, 18 Apr 2016 (photo by Kate St. John)

Flowers are blooming everywhere and trees will soon leaf out.  Don’t miss your chance to get outdoors while the weather’s fine.

Join me for a bird and nature walk in Schenley Park this Sunday, April 24, 8:30am – 10:30am. Meet at the Schenley Park Visitors Center.  Click here for information and updates.

Or join one of these many outings — April 23 through May 1.

Everyone is welcome to participate. Click on the links for directions, meeting places, what to bring, and phone numbers for the leaders.

2016: Date/Time Focus Location Leader & Link to more info
Sat. Apr 23, 9:30am Birds & Potluck lunch Raccoon Creek State Park, Beaver County Ryan Tomazin, 3RBC / Brooks Bird Club
Sat. Apr 23, 10:00am Flowers Boyce-Mayview, Upper St. Clair, Allegheny County Judy Stark, BotSocWPA
Sat. Apr 23, 2:00pm Flowers Brady’s Run Park, Beaver County Peggy Gorrell & Loree Speedy, BotSocWPA
Sun. Apr 24, 7:30am Birds Buffalo Creek IBA-80, Washington County Larry Helgerman, 3RBC
Sun. Apr 24, 8:30am Birds & Flowers Schenley Park, Pittsburgh Kate St. John, Outside My Window
Sun. Apr 24, 8:30am Birds Frick Park, Pittsburgh Jack & Sue Solomon, 3RBC
Fri. Apr 29, 7:30am Birds Sewickley Park, Allegheny County Bob Van Newkirk, 3RBC / Fern Hollow Nature Center
Sat. Apr 30, 10:00am Flowers Powdermill Nature Reserve, Westmoreland County Martha Oliver, BotSocWPA
Sun. May 1, 8:00am All Day! Birds & Flowers Enlow Fork Extravaganza, Washington/Greene Counties Wheeling Creek Watershed Conservancy / BotSocWPA / Ralph Bell Bird Club

 

Don’t miss April flowers. Let’s get outdoors!

 

p.s. The flower shown above is a member of the Pink family called star chickweed or great chickweed (Stellaria pubera).  It looks unremarkable until you get close.  🙂

(photo by Kate St. John)

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Apr 10 2016

Blue-Eyed Mary in Bloom

Published by under Phenology,Plants

Blue-eyed Mary blooming at Cedar Creek Park, 6 April 2016 (photo by Donna Foyle)

Blue-eyed Mary blooming at Cedar Creek Park, 6 April 2016 (photo by Donna Foyle)

It’s cold this morning — and snowy for some of you — but when the weather improves you’ll find …

Blue-eyed Mary (Collinsia verna) usually blooms in southwestern Pennsylvania from mid April to early May but we found it at Cedar Creek Park on Wednesday April 6.

This annual drops its seeds in summer, germinates seedlings in the fall, and overwinters to bloom in the spring.  It spreads by reseeding so you usually find it in patches — that look more green than blue from a distance.

Blue-eyed Mary patch at Cedar Creek Park, 6 April 2016 (photo by Donna Foyle)

Blue-eyed Mary patch at Cedar Creek Park, 6 April 2016 (photo by Donna Foyle)

Collinsia verna grows in woodlands with light to dappled shade and moist to mesic rich loamy soil.  Though the plant can be locally abundant, its habitat can be hard to find.  Blue-eyed Mary is endangered in New York and Tennessee.

Here are three places in southwestern Pennsylvania to see Blue-eyed Mary this month:

 

(photos by Donna Foyle)

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Mar 30 2016

Too Early Spring

Published by under Phenology,Plants

Bloodroot gone to seed, Cedar Creek Park, 27 March 2016 (photo by Kate St. John)

Bloodroot gone to seed, Cedar Creek Park, 27 March 2016 (photo by Kate St. John)

Spring is coming in fits and starts but mostly it’s coming too soon in southwestern Pennsylvania.

On Easter Day I took a walk at Cedar Creek Park in Westmoreland County and found native plants blooming two to three weeks ahead of schedule.  No wonder! It was 75 degrees F.

At top, bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis) was already blooming. Some had gone to seed.

Spring beauties were everywhere. This Carolina spring beauty (Claytonia caroliniana) is identifiable by its wide leaves.

Spring beauty, Cedar Creek Park, 27 March 2016 (photo by Kate St. John)

Spring beauty, Cedar Creek Park, 27 March 2016 (photo by Kate St. John)

The steep hillside known for snow trillium (Trillium nivale) …

Snow trillium, Cedar Creek Park, 27 March 2016 (photo by Kate St. John)

Snow trillium, Cedar Creek Park, 27 March 2016 (photo by Kate St. John)

… was also hosting sharp-lobed hepatica (Hepatica nobilis var. acuta), some of which were past their prime.

Sharp-lobed hepatica, Cedar Creek Park, 27 March 2016 (photo by Kate St. John)

Sharp-lobed hepatica, Cedar Creek Park, 27 March 2016 (photo by Kate St. John)

 

Get outdoors as soon as you can!  Spring could pass you by.

 

p.s. The Botanical Society of Western Pennsylvania is already alert to this early growing season.  They moved up their snow trillium outing from April 2 to March 20.

(photos by Kate St. John)

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Mar 27 2016

Schenley Park Last Week

Published by under Plants,Schenley Park

Coltsfoot blooming in Schenley Park, 18 and 24 March 2016 (photo by Kate St. John)

Coltsfoot blooming in Schenley Park, 18 and 24 March 2016 (photo by Kate St. John)

Spring is early, as expected, so I wasn’t surprised to find leaves unfurling in Schenley Park last week.  Here are a few highlights from my walks in the past nine days.

Above, coltsfoot (Tussilago farfara) began blooming on March 7 and was still flowering when I passed by on March 24.

Below, Ohio buckeyes (Aesculus glabra) are one of the first trees to leaf out in Schenley Park.  These leaves picked up fluff from other trees whose flower parts had blown away, perhaps a wind dispersal strategy.  The buckeye makes flowers that attract bees.

Ohio buckeye leaves unfurl, 24 March 2016 (photo by Kate St. John)

Ohio buckeye leaves unfurl, 24 March 2016 (photo by Kate St. John)

 

Purple deadnettle (Lamium purpureum) began blooming March 10 and will continue for many weeks. Its flower has a spotted lip that says, “Land here, little insect.”

Purple deadnettle blooming, Schenley Park 18 and 24 March 2016 (photo by Kate St. John)

Purple deadnettle blooming, Schenley Park 18 and 24 March 2016 (photo by Kate St. John)

 

The weather’s been mild so get outdoors soon. Don’t miss our early Spring.

Happy Easter!

 

(photos by Kate St. John)

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Mar 17 2016

Which Plant is the Real Shamrock?

Published by under Plants

Shamrock (image from Wikimedia Commons)

Shamrock (image from Wikimedia Commons)

We’re seeing a lot of shamrocks today because they’re a symbol of St. Patrick and the national emblem of Ireland.

The shamrock looks like a clover leaf and that got me wondering …  Which clover is the real shamrock?

According to Wikipedia, the answer goes so far back in history that no one is sure.  Some botanists claimed it was a clover species (Trifolium sp.), others said wood sorrel (Oxalis acetosella).  The best answers came from the Irish themselves.

Two surveys were conducted in Ireland about 100 years apart, in 1893 and 1988, asking for the identity of the shamrock plant.  About 50% of the respondents said it was lesser clover (Trifolium dubium), shown below.  Imported to North America, we call it “least hop clover.”

Lesser or Least Hop Clover, Trifolium dubium (photo from Wikimedia Commons)

Lesser (or Least Hop) Clover, Trifolium dubium (photo from Wikimedia Commons)

About 30% of respondents voted for white clover (Trifolium repens) as the true shamrock.  This is the familiar clover found in traditional lawns (those not treated with broadleaf weed killer).

White clover, Trifolium repens (photo from Wikimedia Commons)

White clover, Trifolium repens (photo from Wikimedia Commons)

Don’t be fooled by four-leaf clovers.  They aren’t real shamrocks because …

St. Patrick used the shamrock’s 3 leaflets to illustrate the Trinity — Father, Son and Holy Ghost — and thus convert the Irish to Christianity.

So celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with a three-leaf clover: least hop or white.

 

(photos from Wikimedia Commons. Click on the image to see the original)

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Mar 06 2016

Green Leaves in the Woods

Published by under Phenology,Plants

Garlic mustard in winter (photo by Kate St. John)

Garlic mustard in winter (photo by Kate St. John)

I should be excited to see green leaves poking up in the woods but these are bad ones.

Garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) is a biennial alien invasive.  It turns green early because it’s out of synch with our seasons — and that gives it a growing advantage over many native plants.  Read more here about its invasive ways.

The only place I know of in western Pennsylvania that has no garlic mustard is Duff Park in Murrysville, thanks to the vigilance and activism of Pia van de Venne.   Over the years she has pulled out tons of garlic mustard, trained countless volunteers in invasive plant eradication, and placed signs at every park entrance that describe garlic mustard and urge folks to pull it up.

Everywhere else, these leaves are our first sign of spring.  🙁

 

(photo by Kate St. John)

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Feb 27 2016

Reading the Palms

Published by under Plants

Comparing Palms: Scrub Palmetto, Saw Palmetto, Sabal Palm (illustration by Chuck Tague)

Comparing Palms: Scrub Palmetto, Saw Palmetto, Sabal Palm (illustration by Chuck Tague)

Until last Thursday I thought these palms were hard to identify. On our visit to Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, Chuck Tague explained that if you look at the stem and arrangement of fronds it’s easy to tell the difference between these three Florida natives.

Scrub palmetto’s (Sabal etonia) fronds all grow from the tip of the stem in a palmate fan — the way your fingers branch out from your palm. It never stands up like a tree because its trunk usually remains underground. We saw a Florida scrub-jay perched on scrub palmetto at Scrub Ridge Trail.

Saw palmetto’s (Serenoa repens) fronds are also palmate but the stem is serrated, giving the “saw” in its name.  This one doesn’t stand up either. Its trunk lies on the ground or just below the soil.

Sabal palm’s (Sabal palmetto) fronds are pinnate, sprouting on two sides of the stem instead of from the tip. These palms are upright and become trees up to 65 feet tall — the state trees of Florida and South Carolina.

Look closely at the fronds and stems and you can read the palms.

 

p.s. Did you know these fallen-off stems are called boots?  People sometimes trim them off but they should be left on the trunk to support the tree.

"Boots" on a sabal palm (photo by Chuck Tague)

“Boots” on a sabal palm (photo by Chuck Tague)

 

(photos by Chuck Tague)

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Jan 02 2016

December Rose

Published by under Plants,Weather & Sky

A rose in Pittsburgh, 30 Dec 2015 (photo by Kate St. John)

Rose blooming in Pittsburgh, 30 Dec 2015 (photo by Kate St. John)

This week I found several roses in bloom in my neighborhood.

Roses blooming at the end of December?  In Pittsburgh?

Last month there were only two nights below freezing at the airport (Dec 18-20, 29 to 30oF), but it probably didn’t drop below freezing in my city neighborhood.  This coming Monday night, January 4, the low is predicted to be 12oF.

That’s what a crazy winter it’s been!

 

(photo by Kate St. John)

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