Archive for the 'Bird Behavior' Category

Sep 25 2015

Bald Eagle Takes Selfie on Stolen Camera

Bald eagle screenshot from Mason Colby's video on YouTube

More than a year ago Mason Colby decided to film bald eagles in Craig, Alaska by setting up his Go Pro camera next to some salmon heads.

Things were going well until an immature bald eagle stole the camera!  Mason wrote on YouTube:

Set up my go pro next to some salmon heads from the days catch to film the eagles eating and next thing I know, one of them swoops down and snags the camera right off the ground. It carried it up to a mile away and I lost sight of it. For four hours we searched in the rain until I finally found it and the camera was still intact. So glad I got the footage!

Click on the screenshot to see what happened.


(screenshot from Mason Colby on YouTube. This video was featured by JunkinVideo on 3 Sept 2015)

p.s. Bald eagles are more plentiful and gregarious in Alaska than in Pennsylvania except for this once-a-year exception: They congregate at Conowingo Dam on the Susquehanna in November, just south of PA in Maryland.

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Sep 18 2015

Like Plunging Arrows

Here’s a bird I see in Maine that we’ll never see in Pittsburgh.

Northern gannets (Sula bassana) nest in cliff colonies on both sides of the North Atlantic.  In the fall the Canadian population visits the Gulf of Maine on their way south for the winter.  The adults will spend October to April off the U.S. Atlantic coast while the juveniles may winter as far south as the Gulf coast.

Gannets are large seabirds (6.5 foot wingspan) that catch fish by plunge-diving from 30 to 130 feet above the sea.  When the fishing is good a huge flock gathers overhead, diving over and over again.  The video shows their amazing fishing technique, both in the air and underwater.

And, yes, these birds are moving fast.  They hit the water’s surface at 60 to 75 miles an hour!  Gannets can do this safely because they have no external nostrils and their faces and chests have air sacs that cushion their brains and bodies like bubble wrap.

Watch them plunge like arrows into the sea.


(video from the Smithsonian Channel on YouTube)

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Sep 17 2015

TBT: Flightless

Common eiders in flight (photo from Wikimedia Commons)

Common eiders in flight (photo from Wikimedia Commons)

Here’s something I’ve never seen:  Common eiders in flight.

I see common eiders every year when I visit in Maine in September but I’ve never seen them fly.

The reason why is in this Throw Back Thursday article from September 2012 –>  Flightless


(photo from Wikimedia Commons. Click on the image to see the original)

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Sep 11 2015

The Haunting Call Of The Loon

Every year my husband and I spend a relaxing two weeks at Acadia National Park where we enjoy spectacular scenery, wildlife, and hiking trails. Now that we’re heading home I’ll share some of the highlights.  The best is a sound that I will certainly miss in Pittsburgh — the haunting call of the loon (Gavia immer).

In September common loons migrate through Canada and Maine from interior lakes to the sea. Each one migrates alone, independent of its mate and offspring.

One particular loon, distinctive because he was molting into winter plumage, often spent his evenings at the harbor.  Every morning I heard him make the tremolo call at dawn (click here to hear) but last Wednesday, when the fog came up just after rain, he made a haunting wail call that echoed among the mountains.

Watch the video above to learn what the wail means.

I wish I’d heard a call in response.


(video on YouTube from Cornell Lab of Ornithology)

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Aug 28 2015

Virtual Lobster For Lunch

Belted Kingfisher (screenshot from YouTube video)

Did you know that belted kingfishers eat crayfish as well as fish?

In this YouTube video a female belted kingfisher hunts from a perch and returns with a crayfish.

The crayfish is so large, compared to the bird, that it looks like she’s caught a lobster.  How will she eat it?

Click on the screenshot to watch.


(screenshot from YouTube video by Mark J. Thomas)

4 responses so far

Aug 27 2015

TBT: Dust Baths

Published by under Bird Behavior

House Sparrow taking a dust bath (photo by Vishnevskiy Vasily via Shutterstock)

House Sparrow taking a dust bath (photo by Vishnevskiy Vasily via Shutterstock)

On Throw Back Thursday (TBT):

Have you noticed house sparrows playing in “puddles” of dust?

Here’s what they’re doing in this article from August 2009:  Why Do Birds Take Dust Baths?


(photo by Vishnevskiy Vasily via Shutterstock)

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Aug 24 2015

On Time For Jewelweed

Ruby-throated hummingbird in Schenley Park, August 2015 (photo by Soji Yamakawa)

Ruby-throated hummingbird in Schenley Park, August 2015 (photo by Soji Yamakawa)
Click on this photo to see a slideshow.

Though many people have hummingbird feeders they aren’t enough to support the birds on migration.  What do ruby-throated hummingbirds eat on their way south?

A study by R.I. Bertin in 1982 found that their primary food source is orange jewelweed (Impatiens capensis) shown in the photo above.  Birds of North America online says:

“Overland migration in North America is nearly synchronous with peak flowering of jewelweed (Impatiens capensis), suggesting this flower is an important nectar source during this time and may influence the timing of migration.”

This month orange jewelweed is thriving by the creek and wetland in Schenley Park.  That’s where I found Soji Yamakawa with his camera last week, spending many hours photographing hummingbirds before his work resumes at Carnegie-Mellon’s Mechanical Engineering Department this fall.   Click on the photo above to see a slideshow of his favorite shots.

Soji and I chatted about the birds and noted there were no adult males in the group. Most adult males have left our area by the second week of August but look closely at the throats of these birds and you’ll see faint stippling or a small patch of red feathers.  They’re immature males, just hatched this spring.

If you want to see hummingbirds in the wild this month, stake out a patch of orange jewelweed and watch for movement among the flowers.  You’ll get a bonus, too.  Rose-breasted grosbeaks forage among the stems, eating the jewelweed seeds.


p.s.  That white patch just above the hummingbird’s bill is jewelweed pollen.

(photos by Soji Yamakawa)

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Aug 20 2015

TBT: Acrobatic Goldfinches

Published by under Bird Behavior

American goldfinch at upside down thistle feeder (photo by Marcy Cunkelman)

American goldfinch at upside down thistle feeder (photo by Marcy Cunkelman)

Throw Back Thursday (TBT)

My upside-down feeder made the goldfinches try new acrobatics in this post from August 2008:  Acrobatic Goldfinches


(photo by Marcy Cunkelman)

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Aug 18 2015

Small and Belligerent

Male ruby-throated hummingbird in bander's hand (photo by Kate St.John)

Male ruby-throated hummingbird in bander’s hand (bander Bob Mulvihill, photo by Kate St.John)

Now that the breeding season is over and dry weather is suppressing native flowers, ruby-throated hummingbirds are swarming to backyard feeders in Pennsylvania.  All of them are small and feisty, but did you know the males are even smaller and more belligerent than the females?

Ruby-throated hummingbirds are sexually dimorphic in size though they’re all so tiny that only a bander could know.  At banding, birds are weighed and measured and so we’ve learned that male ruby-throats are about 87% the size of females in wing length and weight(*).  Their size is related to their lifestyle.

Female ruby-throated hummingbird in bander's hand (photo by Kate St.John)

Female (or is this an immature?) ruby-throated hummingbird in bander’s hand (bander Bob Mulvihill, photo by Kate St.John)

Male hummingbirds are the original deadbeat dads.  Ruby-throated males rush north in the spring to claim territories with lots of food which they vigorously defend with aerial displays, chasing, and bill-to-bill sword battles.

When a female shows up the male doesn’t welcome her at first (he acts annoyed) but he switches to intensive courtship displays when she perches.  Good hovering technique really impresses her and to do it well he needs lots of energy, smaller wings, and a lighter body than hers — which he has.

As soon as he’s mated with one lady he looks for the next.  He never helps with nesting and young and is so focused on attracting another female and warding off other males that he may forego feeding for much of the day.  Banders have found that adult males lose weight in June and July, though they regain it in August.

By the end of the breeding season there are noticeably fewer adult males than females at bird banding stations.  In a study done at Powdermill Nature Reserve, Bob Mulvihill and Bob Leberman found that the adult sex ratio is most skewed in the fall when there are 4.1 adult females for every 1 adult male.

Their paper(*), published in The Condor in 1992, describes why more adult males die in the summer than at other times of year:

“As a species, the Ruby-throated Hummingbird is near the extreme of small size that is physiologically possible for an endothermic vertebrate. It is conceivable that males approach a critical body mass during the summer.  Below this critical mass they may have to abandon nocturnal homeothermy for hypothermic torpor, and may starve overnight or during periods of inclement weather.”

Male ruby-throated hummingbirds are so small and belligerent that it shortens their lives.


(photos taken at the Neighborhood Nestwatch bird banding at Marcy & Dan Cunkelman’s by Kate St. John, 18 July 2015.  Bob Mulvihill is the bander holding the birds.)
(*) The paper by Robert S. Mulvihill and Robert C. Leberman is entitled A Possible Relationship Between Reversed Sexual Size Dimorphism and Reduced Male Survivorship in the Ruby-throated Hummingbird, published in The Condor 94: 480-489.  It’s available as a PDF here at Sora.  Their work is cited in the ruby-throated hummingbird account at Cornell’s Birds of North America.

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Aug 13 2015

TBT: Talking Turkey

Wild Turkey baby (photo by Tim Vechter)

Throw Back Thursday (TBT):

Speaking of wild turkeys, as I did on Tuesday, here’s more about on their family life and a cute baby picture in this post from August 2008 –>  Talking Turkey.


(photo by Time Vechter)

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